9 Important Steps for Avoiding Blended Family Chaos Mediating the Challenges to Step-parenting

9 Important Steps for Avoiding Blended Family Chaos Mediating the Challenges to Step-parenting

For those new to blended families, you may find the title confusing. If you are one about to set up a blended family, you may not understand what I mean by blended family chaos when you are planning your future. After all, the kids have been hanging out and playing nicely up until this point. Your story will be different. I’m here to tell you, if you are looking for a key piece of divorce advice for men, read this whole thing! Odds are you will one day attempt this very thing.

Anyone out there living the “joy” of a blended family today? Do you find it as shown on television? The world is never as portrayed on television. The best divorce advice for men regarding blended family chaos does NOT come from the Brady Bunch! Here a man with three boys marries the woman with three girls and they all get along wonderfully, and resolve minor conflicts in less than 30 minutes. The real world laughs at this absurdity!

Several years ago, I attended a wedding that set the stage for blended family chaos. The bride’s parents had divorced when “Holly” was in elementary school. Her mother remarried shortly thereafter, and the stepfather, “Tim,” was instrumental in Holly’s life. So important that, when it was time to plan the wedding, there was no question that Tim would walk her down the aisle.

But at the wedding reception when the emcee announced the father-daughter dance, both Holly’s biological father and her stepfather walked onto the dance floor. A shouting match ensued, and it was uncomfortable for everyone. Especially the bride.

How awful do you think this made the daughter and bride feel? It’s easy for us to analyze this from the comfort of our seats and recognize the behavior was pathetic. But when you are the one in the heat of the moment, emotions are flared up, you see your ex happy with another and old feelings kick in, and you potentially have some alcohol giving you a boost, your personal decisions may not be the best. Weddings are hard enough anyway. Non-blended families have their own stresses at the wedding as discussed here. Throw in the old wounds of divorce and you have to be ready to not ruin the event for your kids.

Not All Step-parents are Evil

What did we learn from this awkward scenario? Well, the obvious lesson — anticipate these moments when planning the wedding and reception, and communicate the decisions ahead of time. But what about the subtle lesson? Not all stepparents are evil. Some even have the ability to love beyond their own progeny. Step-relationships do not have to result in blended family chaos.

Let’s take a look at a couple of scenarios you might be able to visualize.

Scenario #1:  Your ex remarries, and her new husband has kids of his own. The newlyweds are able to sync their custody/visitation dates together so that they either have all their respective kids, or none.  When your kids spend time with you, all they do is complain about their evil stepfather and his obnoxious children. What words of wisdom do you pass along to your own kids about their new blended family?

Scenario #2:  You remarry, and your new wife has kids of her own. She has primary custody of her children, and their father is pretty much out of the picture. So now you’re a stepdad, essentially raising and supporting somebody else’s kids. How do you navigate this newly blended family without affecting your relationship with your wife?

Could you be reading about anyone you know?

Exploring the New Family Dynamic

Bringing up the role of a future stepparent isn’t generally discussed during divorce mediation. But subsequent marriages and blended families may eventually happen. This could be the perfect storm, or it could be a perfect opportunity to revisit your divorce mediator, only this time to talk about issues within the new dynamic. Sometimes, it’s even a good idea to bring along the entire blended family.

In my mediation practice, I have achieved success in helping families avoid Blended Family Chaos.

Imagine you, your new spouse, and your respective children all sitting in a conference room. The kids are spinning around in their chairs, your wife is clutching her Starbucks cup with both hands, and you are nervously tapping the end of your pencil against the table top. I walk in with a smile on my face, and immediately address the kids; writing down their names and ages.

This seemingly simple tactic of writing down the name of each kid and his/her age is my way of showing that the kids are as important in this process as the adults. Next, I’ll explain the ground rules – that I’m here to listen and to make sure each person has an equal opportunity to talk, uninterrupted, with the goal of achieving some understanding.

I’m not saying this produces instant results. Kids need to feel comfortable with their counselor to even begin to open up. Kids with other mental health challenges present unique challenges. However, all kids need time to get comfortable before the real therapy begins. For you parents this means be patient. Your kids aren’t going to respond right away, that’s the one guarantee.

Not too long ago, in my very own conference room, I empowered a 10-year-old girl to express her concern about sharing a bedroom with her eight-year-old stepsister. Everybody listened to understand her fears and concerns, and then both sisters created a code of conduct about their stuff.  The entire family talked about acceptable behavior and also about consequences. I took notes, and then prepared a written agreement between the two girls. They solemnly signed it as though they were entering into a contract to rent an apartment. The impact was unmistakable. And the parents took it very seriously.

Of course, there are different issues when it comes to teenagers. If the stepparent’s teens are allowed unlimited use of cell phones, computers, and automobiles, but the biological parent’s teens are not, whose rules govern?  This is another opportunity for a neutral third party to help the entire family brainstorm about what is reasonable, fair, and enforceable.  Once decided, the Mediator may draw up a written agreement for the entire family to sign, outlining the new rules.  Naturally, after the agreement is has been signed, it’s binding, and you and your spouse must also agree to the terms, including enforcement of the consequences.

When Kids Hate the New Partner

So what happens if your new partner’s kids take an instant dislike to YOU?  (Or vice-versa?)

I recently had the opportunity to work with a blended family where the stepmother’s dislike of her new husband’s 14-year-old daughter wreaked havoc on their marriage, and she was ready to file for divorce.  The teenager had been in therapy, but it obviously was having no material effect on the family dynamic.  The husband chose not to play the adult card with his belligerent daughter, and opted instead to seek out the help of a family mediator. Within the first 20 minutes, it was obvious that the daughter was able to open up more to me than she had in several therapy sessions. Why?  Because I’m a mediator, not a therapist. Mediators are trained to listen and ask questions without judgment. In this case, the daughter desperately wanted her biological parents to reconcile. We all heard her say the words, and then I gently asked her what would happen if the reconciliation was impossible. She literally took a deep breath, sat up straighter, and began to talk about her future.

Helping people in conflict move forward is what Mediators are trained to do.

Families, especially those with teenagers, seem to find something less threatening about choosing mediation over family therapy. And let’s not forget that it’s likely way less expensive.

Blended family mediations have tremendous success because all of the family members have an equal voice. It’s no surprise that many second (or subsequent) marriages fail because of the chaos caused by conflict about the kids and stepchildren.

Critical Steps for Avoiding Mixed Family Chaos

To avoid blended-family chaos, I urge you to consider these nine steps:

  1. Don’t show favoritism.Whether you’re obviously favoring your own children over your stepkids, or you’re over-compensating by favoring your stepchildren over your own, the kids will call you on it.  And they’ll be right to point it out to you.
  2. Don’t be played. Your kids know just how to get to you, whether it’s by dishing out some guilt, or by acting out, or by other devious methods to “punish” you for divorcing their mom and marrying their Wicked Stepmother.  Recognize it and avoid it like the plague.
  3. Be consistent. When you and your spouse establish new ground rules, whether with the help of a family mediator or not, make sure those rules are enforced equally and without exception.   Your entire family will benefit if you and your spouse put up a united front.
  4. Stand by what’s important. You and your new spouse will not always agree. Often the stronger personality will win on many rules and standards for the blended home. As dads, we sometimes seek the compromise and by doing so, can force our kids into a setting that is drastically different for them. Know your key stances on home environment and don’t give in when setting the baseline with the new spouse just to get it moving.
  5. Compliment each kid. Find something to praise each child about frequently.  I’m absolutely not suggesting that you hand out participation trophies simply for being a member of the family.  Rather, I’m encouraging you to find something noteworthy and express it to each child, preferably in front of everybody.  Dinner table compliments are an easy habit to establish and you’ll not only be boosting their self-esteem, but also your own ratings.
  6. Meet your new kids. Yes, don’s show favoritism. But you also need to get to know your step kids. This doesn’t take much, however you need to be aware of your human nature to go to your comfort zone. You know your kids. So you will naturally chat with them. Get to know the new ones…make an effort. You will likely have to remind yourself.
  7. Nurture your marriage. I saved this one for last because in my opinion, it’s the most important.  Have regular date nights with your spouse.  Remind yourselves (and each other) why you’re together in the first place, and why you’ve committed yourselves to raising this blended family in the best way possible.
  8. Flexible holidays. When you blend a family, you increase the number of families that have to work together. Your new step-kids have another parent, and your kids have another. At holiday time, the different groups of kids will be heading in different directions. Just remember to stay flexible. Your kids are the ones really feeling the stress of going between households. Do your best to make their time at your home low-stress.
  9. Go almost all-in. You’ve got to be ready to push all the chips in from the start and fully commit to the new family for any hope of making it work. However, just like Vegas, keep a chip or two in your pocket for cab money, or Uber for the younger crowd. Never forget who the #1 advocate for your children is (hint: it’s you)! If you’ve gone the full road and applied your soul to making it work, but your partner has not or it is just tearing your kids apart, you may need to use that saved chip to pack it up. Sad fact, but they come first. Don’t let them know this, or they’ll do everything to get you to depart. But you’ll know when.

Don’t Give Up On Your Blended Family

Okay, now what?  You say you’ve made the effort to avoid Blended Family Chaos by following the nine steps above, but your relationship with your stepchildren is still causing stress in the family, and in your marriage? Or, what if your blended family needs a tune-up because the kids are older and the issues have changed accordingly?

Find a family mediator in your community and schedule an appointment. Be proactive and you won’t have to deal with Blended Family Chaos.

Nancy Gabriel is the principal and managing partner of Mediation Around The Table, LLC., a Las Vegas-based private mediation company.  Ms. Gabriel is a founding director of Nevada Mediation Group, a non-profit corporation focusing on the education and training of mediators, a volunteer for the Neighborhood Justice Center of Clark County, Nevada, a member of the divorce panel for MWI, a Boston, Massachusetts firm specializing in alternative dispute resolutions, and a volunteer at Three Square Food Bank.  She is a graduate of UCLA, an avid gourmet cook and NFL fan. She may be contacted through the firm website at www.MediationAroundTheTable.com

 

Image courtesy of stockunlimited.com

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You Can Modify a Parenting Plan Without Going to Court Using Mediation to Resolve Co-parenting Disputes

You Can Modify a Parenting Plan Without Going to Court Using Mediation to Resolve Co-parenting Disputes

You’re divorced, child custody was settled, and there is a working parenting plan in place. Life goes on, then changing circumstances affect you and your kids. The good news is that you can modify a parenting plan without going back to court.

Mom Was Moving Out of State

I had the opportunity to help an already divorced couple re-negotiate their parenting plan without having to go back to court and shell out thousands of dollars for litigation.  Here’s how it went down:   The couple, “Ruth” and “Justin” had been divorced for 11 years, sharing custody of their now 13-year-old daughter, “Lexi”.   Their co-parenting of Lexi had its issues; however, Ruth and Justin had been able to compromise most of the time. 

But Ruth recently remarried, and received a job promotion which necessitated relocation across the country.  Both Ruth and her daughter were excited to move to Atlanta.  It was happening just as Lexi was about to start high school and, although she was sad about leaving her friends, she had a good attitude about her new adventure.  So, most of the big decisions had been made:  new house, moving date, school enrollment.  The final remaining stumbling block was obtaining Justin’s permission to move his daughter out of state.

Dad Didn’t Want to Lose Visitation

Understandably, Justin was not immediately on board to consent to his daughter moving 2,500 miles away from him.  His divorce decree and parenting plan prohibited Ruth from taking their minor daughter away from the state for more than seven consecutive days, and Justin was quite adamant about sticking to the plan.   He was also very clear that he was unwilling to lose any of his visitation days with Lexi.

Start by Nailing Down the Issues

When they came to my office for their first mediation session, we quickly identified that there were three issues that needed to be resolved:  permission to move the minor child out of state; modifying the visitation schedule to accommodate the relocation; and who was going to pay for the travel expenses.  Permission to move the minor child required very little discussion.  Although Justin didn’t want his daughter to move across the country, he understood that she would benefit by being in a better school district and, as it turned out, being closer to other members of her extended family.  Permission granted, and onto the next issue:  scheduling.

Baby Steps in Mediation

Everyone took out calendars, and we started talking about school schedules, holidays, vacations, and the complications of air travel.  It was evident to me, as the Mediator, that the parents were becoming overwhelmed.  So, I suggested that we only discuss the upcoming school year.  By limiting the scheduling to nine months rather than five years, both Justin and Ruth visibly relaxed.  After that, it was like trading players on a fantasy football team.  “I’ll take the first week of the winter break and you can have her the second week.”  Or, “I’d prefer that Lexi spend her birthday with me, so she can be with her grandparents.”  You get the picture.

By taking a baby step in mediation, Justin and Ruth were able to focus on establishing a temporary plan, leaving room for flexibility, instead of being forced to follow a Court Order.  Mediation allowed these two parents to focus on the needs of their daughter instead of on their own interests.

Once these two hurdles were overcome, the final issue of who pays for airfare turned out to be relatively easy.  Justin started the negotiation process by offering to pay zero dollars for Lexi’s airfare.  I let them argue for a moment, and then asked Ruth how much she was willing to pay.  Ruth said 50%.  Justin countered back at 1/3, and it was as though the bell signaling the end of the round in a heavyweight fight had been heard.  Ruth agreed to pay 2/3 and they went back to their neutral corners.  The bout had ended, not by knock-out, but by unanimous decision.

A Winning Way to Modify a Parenting Plan

Three issues, three resolutions, two hours total.   I wrote up a document to modify their parenting plan incorporating their decisions; they signed it in front of my Notary, and everyone left feeling like they won.

Mediation Empowers the Parents

You can only imagine how long this might have taken through litigation, not to mention the expense.  And most significant, imagine the risk involved in allowing a Judge to determine what’s best for the family.  A Judge who, although well-intended, has no real knowledge of the family’s dynamic.   By opting to modify a parenting plan through the process of mediation, Justin and Ruth were empowered to craft their own resolution and, in this particular instance, by making a temporary agreement to be revisited later, if necessary.

Naturally, not every divorced couple is a candidate for mediation.  They must come into the process carrying a spirit of cooperation in their pockets.

Mediation After a Bitter Divorce

In another example, “Ben” and “Sara” went through a bitter divorce when their two kids were toddlers.  They each ran up tens of thousands of dollars in attorneys’ fees because Ben wanted the divorce and Sara intended to “make him pay.”  And he sure did!

Not only did Ben get his shirt handed to him in Court, but he had minimal visitation with his children and paid the maximum in child support.  They came to me literally 10 years later because circumstances had changed considerably over the decade since their divorce.  The two kids were now teenagers, and were proving to be more than Sara was willing or able to handle.  Not only did Ben want more time with his kids, the kids wanted to live with their dad permanently.

Modify a Parenting Plan to Change Primary Custody

Through the process of mediation, it came out that neither of the teenagers liked Sara’s live-in boyfriend.  And the boyfriend was, evidently, jealous of the attention Sara gave to her own children.  The living situation in Sara’s home was full of conflict, and neither of the kids was happy.   Enough time had passed for Sara to get over her bitterness towards Ben, and both parents were ready to make some changes.  So, they hammered out a new parenting plan, modifying everything including primary physical custody, and child support.  Again, I prepared a written document for them to sign which set forth all of the modifications.

Mediation Reduced Court Appearances and Costs

In Ben and Sara’s instance, a brief amount of attorney involvement was necessary.  Once they signed the agreement I prepared after mediation, Ben’s attorney drafted the necessary paperwork to submit to the Court showing that the parties changed the prior Court Order through the process of mediation.  The fact that a Mediator prepared an agreement reflecting the desires of the parties, and that agreement bore the parties’ signatures, all but guaranteed that the Judge would approve the modification.  In less than a month, Ben and Sara received the Court’s blessing by way of an Order modifying their divorce decree to afford Ben primary physical custody of their teenagers, and considerably reducing the child support payments.

How Mediation Can Work For You

There are many more examples of how mediation can be an effective way of modifying prior Court Orders without the need for expensive and time-consuming litigation.  The one common thread in every such situation is the spirit of compromise.  If you aren’t willing to be flexible, mediation is not for you.  But, if enough time has passed, if you’re willing to put the greater good ahead of your need to be right, if you value your future more than you need to validate your past, I highly urge you to consider mediation.

How to suggest mediation to your ex?  Easy.  Just tell her that you’ve been looking into mediation as an alternative method to litigation, and that mediation is confidential, expedient, and costs a fraction of what attorneys charge.

Finding a Capable Mediator

There are many places to look for a capable Mediator.  When doing so, it’s important to keep in mind that not all Mediators are attorneys, and not all attorneys are Mediators.  I’d suggest that you and your ex interview at least two candidates, check for reviews on Yelp (yes, Yelp), sniff around LinkedIn, and go to subscription services such as Mediate.com.  Most Mediators will offer an initial consultation at no charge.  Then, trust your instincts.  You won’t be disappointed.

Nancy Gabriel is the principal and managing partner of Mediation Around The Table, LLC., a Las Vegas-based private mediation company.  Ms. Gabriel is a founding director of Nevada Mediation Group, a non-profit corporation focusing on the education and training of mediators, a volunteer for the Neighborhood Justice Center of Clark County, Nevada, a member of the divorce panel for MWI, a Boston, Massachusetts firm specializing in alternative dispute resolutions, and a volunteer at Three Square Food Bank.  She is a graduate of UCLA, an avid gourmet cook and NFL fan. She may be contacted through the firm website at www.MediationAroundTheTable.com

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3 Benefits to Ending Your Marriage with Divorce Mediation Why You Should Consider an Alternative to Costly Litigation

3 Benefits to Ending Your Marriage with Divorce Mediation Why You Should Consider an Alternative to Costly Litigation

Think you’re stuck shelling out thousands of dollars to retain an attorney? Well, you’re not. Are you concerned about the risk of allowing a judge to decide what’s best for you and your family?  Well, it doesn’t have to play out that way. Simply stated, there is an alternative:  Divorce Mediation.

You May Be a Candidate for Divorce Mediation

If you and your soon-to-be-ex can be in the same room with each other for an hour, you’re a great candidate to end your marriage through mediation.

A Mediator is a neutral third party who’s trained to help the two of you navigate through the process of ending your relationship in an expedient, dignified and confidential manner, at a fraction of the cost of hiring an attorney.

Valuable Benefits of Divorce Mediation

There are many benefits to choosing divorce mediation.  Here are three of the more significant advantages.

The first benefit of divorce mediation is FREEDOM. 

  • Freedom to make your own choices about the end of your relationship
  • Freedom to use resources the way you want
  • Freedom from having to look back on this chapter of your life with regret or remorse
  • Freedom to move on with your life and enjoy all that the future can be for you
  • Freedom to make your divorce work better than your marriage
  • Freedom to parent your children in the best possible way
  • Freedom from burdensome legal fees

The second benefit of divorce mediation is FAIRNESS.

  • You will meet with a professional mediator who is unbiased, neutral, impartial and non-judgmental. Clients determine their own standard of fairness based on their unique needs.
  • You will be treated fairly and equitably while achieving justice in the process
  • You will avoid the harsh judgments of others
  • You, not the courts, attorneys, or judges, determine your own definition of fairness
  • Those with children will have a role in determining a fair outcome that is in the best interest of your family

The third benefit of divorce mediation is PRIVACY.

  • Your mediation is held in a private, confidential office setting resulting in a private written agreement. Your privacy is maintained through the confidential mediation process.
  • Unlike open court, the mediation process is not a matter of public record
  • You will not be embarrassed or ashamed about personal matters that might be discussed
  • Your friends, relatives and strangers will only know what you decide to tell them
  • You will have a higher rate of compliance since you each contributed to and agreed to how you want to end the relationship

A Civil and Cost-effective Alternative

Divorce mediation is not appropriate when there is a history of domestic abuse, or if one of the parties refuses to cooperate. For couples that agree to divorce, and want to end the marriage in a civil and cost-effective manner, divorce mediation provides a dignified, economical and extremely viable alternative to the hostility of divorce litigation.

nancy-gabriel-picNancy Gabriel is the principal and managing partner of Mediation Around The Table, LLC., a Las Vegas-based private mediation company.  Ms. Gabriel is a founding director of Nevada Mediation Group, a non-profit corporation focusing on the education and training of mediators, a volunteer for the Neighborhood Justice Center of Clark County, Nevada, a member of the divorce panel for MWI, a Boston, Massachusetts firm specializing in alternative dispute resolutions, and a volunteer at Three Square Food Bank.  She is a graduate of UCLA, an avid gourmet cook and NFL fan. She may be contacted through the firm website at www.MediationAroundTheTable.com


(c) Can Stock Photo / designer491

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